CFP Archive

2019 Call For Papers


Liberal arts programs today are often underfunded and underenrolled, while professional programs may command the greatest share of the university’s resources and, increasingly, attract the greatest number of students.  Traditionally, the liberal arts have been a part of every university education, but funding shortfalls and a shift in educational priorities have redefined the liberal arts as a mere embellishment of the more practical knowledge taught in professional programs.  This has led to what seems like intractable conflicts between the aims of a traditional liberal arts education (sparking intellectual curiosity, cultivating the love of learning, and fostering intellectual capacities that are critical for citizenship) and the more limited economic aims of training and credentialing students for the work force.  Is there a way to minimize or avoid this conflict? Can the diverse faculties of the contemporary university rediscover common ground?  At the 2019 annual meeting of the Society for Values in Higher Education, we are seeking to move beyond the standard and sometimes stale arguments to transform the familiar conflict of the faculties into a productive debate.

We invite papers and panel presentations on questions such as:

  • What are some good resources for re-framing the conflict in higher education? How can they be used effectively?
  • What innovative pedagogical practices work through this conflict?
  • How can competition be turned into cooperation in order to maximize the limited resources available in higher education?
  • Which of the stakeholders are defining the success of the students? Who ought to be defining student success? What role do assessment instruments and processes play? What constructive role could they play?
  • How might institutions of higher education be better organized in order to alleviate this conflict? And where is the power and motivation to do something like that? How can various incentive structures be altered to overcome this              conflict?
  • What does this conflict mean in terms of the disciplines and/or the way in which we conceptualize knowledge?
  • What role does general education curriculum play in exacerbating or alleviating this conflict?
  • Do public perceptions of higher education (e.g., public views of speech codes, identity politics on campus, etc.) negatively impact the conflict and competition? If so, what can be done to address those perceptions?

                  Deadline to submit – May 15, 2019                Can’t make it to Chicago? Present virtually (option available on form below)!


Submit your proposal of no more than 1000 words through our website at www.svhe.org. Proposals will be reviewed as they are submitted.

  • Interdisciplinary and/or practice oriented proposals are especially encouraged.
  • Those who have papers accepted and are able to attend benefit from a reduced conference registration rate.
  • Two papers will be selected for the Robert Spivey Excellence in Scholarship Awards which include a prize of $300 each.  Completed papers must be submitted by July 1, 2019 to be eligible.

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2018 Call For Papers


The 2018 Annual Meeting of the Society for Values in Higher Education will explore how personal identities shape and are shaped by the realities of pluralism together with different sorts of, and imbalances of, power. In particular, we ask: Can the formation of a rich plurality of personal identities be consistent with the existence of a collective or national identity? We invite proposals for individual and panel presentations around the following questions (though not limited to these):…

  • While we often talk of freedom, what do we mean by it? Are we referring to a Hobbesian/Lockean liberal model of liberation from constraints? Or are we taking a republican position and underscoring the need for self-restraint, the rule of law, and active citizenship? A Hegelian idea of development of individuality culminating in a shared common life in an integrated community of love and reason as defined in religion? A Marxist view of positive freedom attained through converting the state from an organ superimposed upon society into one subordinate to it? Something else? How might the way we think of freedom be related to how we think of the relationship of personal identity to collective or national identity?
  • How do we determine and ensure the proper stewardship of power? How best do we distribute political power? Does our federalist system secure the general welfare? And what about cultural, social, and economic power—who decides who wields these more abstract forms of power? And how is power implicated in the individual’s pursuit of personal identity?
  • How fluid or static are national, ethnic, religious, racial, sexual and gender identities? Who gets to decide? Do such identities function to secure the common good? How do they interact with materialism, consumerism, nationalism, individualism, and despotism?
  • Is a moral consensus possible, one that serves as a point of departure for the plurality of identities represented in American society?  Can left and right agree on a general set of objective features? If not, or if none exist, what then is the way forward?
  • Is civil discourse—discourse that results in actualizing human goods and services (such as affordable health care for all)—possible? How do we model spirited discourse such that the human dignity of all sides is recognized and respected, no fundamental commitments are de-legitimized, and a compromise leading to balance between individual and common goods is struck? How does a plurality of personal identities help or harm our public discourse, and how best can we move forward?

DEADLINE TO SUBMIT MAY 15, 2018
Can’t make it to Seattle? Present virtually!

Submit your proposal of no more than 1000 words using the form below. Proposals will be reviewed as they are submitted.

  • Interdisciplinary and/or practice oriented proposals are especially encouraged.
  • Those who have papers accepted and are able to attend benefit from a reduced conference registration rate.
  • Two papers will be selected for the Robert Spivey Excellence in Scholarship Awards which includes a prize of $300 each. Completed papers must be submitted by July 1, 2018 to be eligible.

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2017 Call for Papers

Call For Papers bannerSociety for Values in Higher Education 93nd Annual Meeting
Sacrifice, Consumption, and the Public Good
July 12 – 16, 2017
Simmons College, Boston, MA

In 1840, Alexis de Tocquevile observed a bedrock cultural presupposition of Americans in the Age of Jackson. He called this presupposition “interest rightly understood.” In the second volume of Democracy in America, he wrote, “The principle of interest rightly understood produces no great acts of self-sacrifice, but it suggests daily small acts of self-denial. By itself, it cannot suffice to make a man virtuous; but it disciplines a number of persons in habits of regularity, temperance, moderation, foresight, self-command; and, if it does not lead men straight to virtue by will, it gradually draws them in that direction by their habits.”

Today, in the face of challenges of climate change and global poverty, individuals are often asked to make sacrifices in their private lives in order to advance the public good. Within American culture, however, the values of self-care and consumerism can be in tension with those of sacrifice for and service to the public good. And even if an individual makes such sacrifices, she/he might feel that such sacrifices are trivial compared to the magnitude of the problems – leading then to apathy and a prioritization of self-care and consumerism. …

At its 2017 annual meeting, the Society for Values in Higher Education invites presentations and panels on the theme of sacrifice – in particular, the tension between sacrifice and consumption vis-a-vis the public good, what de Tocqueville styled “interest rightly understood.”

Ways to participate
We are committed to providing opportunities for scholars to participate regardless of the amount of funds available to them. Those accepted to present and able to attend the meeting benefit from a reduced registration rate.  If you are unable to come to Boston, you can still participate virtually with a very minimal registration fee. For non-members, both registration fees include a one-year membership in SVHE and a subscription to our journal, Soundings.

Submit a Proposal  (2017 CALL FOR PAPERS ARE CLOSED)
All proposals should be submitted electronically. Begin by simply clicking on the button below. Proposals will be submitted as attachments. Please submit only Word or PDF documents. Proposals should not exceed 1000 words. Proposals will be reviewed as they are submitted. Review will continue until all available slots are filled. No proposals will be accepted after the deadline of May 15, 2017. Interdisciplinary and/or practice oriented proposals are especially encouraged.
Contact Information 
Direct questions and inquiries to Eric Bain-Selbo, Executive Director, Society for Values in Higher Education ([email protected]).
Registration Fees 
All presenters must be registered for the meeting in order to present their work and appear in the program. Those presenting in person will receive a reduced registration rate of $75 for members or $125 for non-members (which includes a complimentary year-long membership in SVHE) for the 2017 Fellows Meeting. Scholars presenting virtually are required to pay a $75 registration fee.
Awards 
Two papers will be selected for the Robert Spivey Excellence in Scholarship Awards that include a prize of $300 each. To be eligible for an award, completed papers must be submitted by July 1, 2017 and presented at the conference or virtually.

Printable version of Call for Papers can be downloaded HERE. 

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2016 Call for Papers

Some see satire and other forms of political humor as undermining the civility necessary for the functioning of a civil society. Others see these forms of expression as signs of healthy democratic discourse. At its 2016 annual meeting, the Society for Values in Higher Education will explore the nature of civil discourse. How can we establish a more robust and productive dialogue with one another—across our political, religious, and cultural divides?

  • What distinguishes political humor from hate speech?
  • When do norms of civility stifle political dissent?
  • Are there moral and religious boundaries within which political humor should be contained?
  • What if any impact does Citizens United have on the quality of civil discourse? To what standards should corporations that fund political attack ads be held?
  • Do anonymous social media undermine or facilitate civil discourse?
  • How can individuals foster civility through participation in local institutions and organizations?
  • What role can colleges and universities play in establishing a genuine civil discourse?

Click here for the PDF.

2015 Call for Papers

91st Annual Meeting: Working Together?  Collaboration and the Future of Higher Education, July 22-25, 2015 at Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, KY

Higher education in the United States is facing unprecedented challenges—the privatization of state schools by virtue of the steady de-funding by legislatures, the dramatic rise of for-profit institutions,  rapidly increasing expectations about what services colleges and universities should provide, and a    complex and global society that demands college graduates with even more skills and capacities. It is  little wonder that so many people think higher education is in a state of crisis. But the current context also provides new opportunities, if only the various constituencies can collaborate together for the good of our students and our institutions…

 

At its 2015 annual meeting, the Society for Values in Higher Education will investigate the role of collaboration, in the midst of apparently competing values, as a mechanism by which colleges and universities can effect change and develop their role in local, national, and global communities. We invite paper or panel presentations that grapple with issues related to moving higher education forward through various collaborations—between different faculties, between faculty and administrators, among faculty, administrators, and staff, and even between colleges and universities and public and private organizations in the broader community. Potential questions to address include (but are not limited to) the following:

  1. How are competing values shaping the future of higher education?
  2. How do these values impact teaching, learning, and research? How might the reconciliation of these values (at least some of them) facilitate the project of higher education?
  3. Where are the opportunities for successful collaboration among various stakeholders—opportunities that will help higher education fulfill its mission(s)?
    1. How can we best conceptualize collaboration in the context of higher education?
    2. What are some good examples of this at our colleges and universities? Can we extract any general guidance from these examples?

Contact Information

Direct inquiries and proposals to Eric Bain-Selbo, Executive Director, Society for Values in Higher     Education ([email protected]). Proposals should not exceed 1000 words. Proposals will be reviewed as they are submitted. Review will continue until all available slots are filled. No proposals will be accepted after the deadline of May 15, 2015. Interdisciplinary and/or practice oriented proposals are especially  encouraged.

Awards

Those selected to present will receive a reduced registration rate of $50 for members or $75 for non-members (which includes a complimentary year-long membership) for the 2015 Fellows Meeting. Two papers will be selected for the Robert Spivey Excellence in Scholarship Awards which include a prize of $300 each.  To be eligible for an award, completed papers must be submitted by July 1, 2015 and authors are required to attend the SVHE meeting to present their papers.

Click Here for a printable poster

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2014 Call for Papers

Minding the Gap: Educating for Economic Justice
St. Thomas University, Minneapolis-St. Paul, MN, July 16-20, 2014

The growing gap in the United States between the rich and the poor (or even between the rich and the middle class) and the increasing concentration of wealth in the hands of the few is difficult to justify. The gap is even greater between the wealthy in developed nations and the destitute in the Third World. A significant amount of research highlights the deleterious effects of wealth inequality on a society and around the globe. These effects include increased crime, mental illness, educational underachievement, and more. In such a situation, American colleges and universities cannot sit idly by. At its 2014 annual meeting, the Society for Values in Higher Education will investigate the gap and reflect upon ways that educational institutions can mind it and mend it.

Papers may address these values from a number of theoretical and (inter)disciplinary perspectives,including but not limited to questions such as:…

 

Exploring the Issues
• What is economic justice? Are we our brother’s (economic) keeper?
• To what extent is violence the basis of economic disparity? Does economic disparity contribute to violence?
• What is the relationship or what is the future relationship of education and the American Dream?
• How does economic disparity affect education?
• How does the widening gap between the rich and poor change the structure of education? Does education replicate inequalities? What are the questions of justice in funding education?
• How do colleges and universities benefit from wealth disparities?
• How does wealth disparity shape our cultures, communities, and our selves?

Bridging the Gap
• How can education facilitate economic justice?
• How can educational institutions address problems of economic inequality?
• Can education address the widening gap of rich and poor?
• How can education help us develop better conceptions and attitudes about wealth and what leads to genuine happiness?

Contact Information

Direct inquiries and proposals to Eric Bain-Selbo, Department Head, Philosophy and Religion, Western Kentucky University ([email protected]). Proposals should not exceed 1000 words. Proposals will be reviewed as they are submitted. Review will continue until all available slots are filled. No proposals will be accepted after the deadline of MAY 30, 2014. Interdisciplinary and/or practice oriented proposals are especially encouraged.

Awards

Those selected to present will receive a reduced registration rate of $50 for members or $75 for non-members (which includes a complimentary year-long membership) for the 2014 Fellows Meeting. Two papers will be selected for special recognition and awarded $300.  To be eligible for an award, completed papers must be submitted by July 1, 2014. Authors are expected to attend the SVHE meeting to present their papers.

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2013 Call for Papers

2013 CPF PromoDebt: Obligations that Shape our Lives
July 24-28, 2013, University of Denver

Societies are structured by webs of financial, legal, psychological, moral, and spiritual obligations. All of these involve debt, broadly construed. From the most mundane, everyday interactions to the complexities of international relations, the language of debt pervades our thinking and discourse. The Society for Values in Higher Education seeks paper and panel proposals to address the concept of debt from a variety of disciplinary perspectives.

 

  • What is the social role of debt?
  • How does it enhance or threaten community?
  • To whom are we indebted?
  • What is the relationship between debt and entitlement?
  • What are the religious or spiritual dimensions of debt?
  • How do various narratives (historical, literary, etc.) shape our views of debt?
  • How does debt threaten the future of higher education? How should higher education address the social and economic consequences of debt?
  • How do we teach our students who owes who what? And why?

Participants selected for presentations will receive a reduced registration rate of $50 to the SVHE summer meeting.  Two papers or panels will be selected for special recognition and awarded $300.  You must be present at the SVHE summer meeting to be considered.  Deadline for submission is June 21, 2013.  Proposals should not exceed 1000 words.  Submit proposals to Eric Bain-Selbo, Department Head, Philosophy and Religion, Western Kentucky University ([email protected]).  Proposals will be reviewed as they are submitted.  Review will continue until all available slots are filled.  For more detailed information visit our website www.svhe.org, and click on Call for Papers 2013.

Click here for a printable poster

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2012 CALL FOR PAPERS

Imagination and Compassion in Higher Education
Drew University, Madison, NJ, August  3-7, 2012

Imagination and compassion are necessary, even obligatory, tools to prepare the next generations to survive and to thrive in a time we may not know, understand, or live to see. Yet, in education today, imagination seems to be, at best, an extracurricular concern while compassion is only the haphazard consequence of the standard curriculum. At its 2012 annual meeting, the Society for Values in Higher Education will investigate the role of imagination and compassion in the ways we understand human realities in order to revitalize their role in higher education.

papers may address these values from a number of theoretical and (inter)disciplinary perspectives, including but not limited to questions such as:…


  • How plastic is human nature? To what degree and in what ways is the human “blank slate” hard-wired? Recent work by primatologists like Frans de Waal argue that empathy is central to our biology. How might such science impact the ways in which we approach pedagogy and curriculum on college campuses?
  • How do we define or enact human connection and embody compassion in today’s world of quantifiable standards and rule-driven behavior?
  • What is compassion and/or imagination? Do they belong in Higher Education? What kind of pedagogies and/or curricula can help cultivate either or both? How can the different disciplines—from humanities to the sciences—approach these human capacities?
  • Amid calls for civility in public discourse and tragic consequences of bullying on college campuses, does higher education bear a responsibility for fostering the former and deterring the latter? What role should higher education play in our democracy?
  • To what extent, if any, is interdisciplinary learning a vehicle for responding to the present and/or envisioning and enacting a better future? How can interdisciplinary work—Disney’s “imagineering”?— foster imagination and compassion?

awards

 Each paper-presenting participant in a working group will receive a $200 registration fee waiver for the 2012 Fellows Meeting. Two papers will be selected for special recognition and awarded $300.00.  To be eligible for an award, completed papers must be submitted by June 1, 2012 and authors must attend the SVHE meeting to present their papers.

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2011 CALL FOR PAPERS

Elmhurst College, Elmhurst, Illinois, July 27-31, 2011
IMMIGRATION AND IDENTITIES: ACADEMIC CULTURES IN TRANSITION

Education is universally valued.  But what constitutes education is debated even by those who share similar backgrounds, ethnicities, language, and professions.  When teachers and students who migrate from other cultures or come from diverse backgrounds add their voices, teaching and learning become more complex.

Academic institutions in the U.S. are gateways to social mobility for their students.  The paths those students choose vary according to their family expectations, their personal experiences, and institutional responses.  “Assimilation” was the watchword in 19th and most of 20th century education.  Today’s small colleges, large universities, and community colleges need new philosophies and strategies to meet the world’s fluctuating national and cultural boundaries, interdependent economies and cross-pollinating intellectual and technological exchange.

Papers may address questions such as:…

  • Can we become a “Nation of Immigrants” that recognizes our hybrid identities and multiple cultural connections, that moves daily from the “familiar” to the “foreign,” from one linguistic mode to another?
  • Can we develop an understanding of human migration without romanticizing immigrants of yesterday and problematizing those of today?
  • How can we see immigration as a cultural process of reciprocal interpretation?  Can academic cultures with roots in 18th century European Enlightenment ideals, 19th century progressive thought, and 20th century scientific development accommodate and value differing ways of knowing and learning?
  • What strategies enable institutions to embrace bottom-up cosmopolitanism everyday cultural diversity and intellectual exchange?
  • Can interdisciplinary teaching and research be a model for intercultural communication and learning?
  • As multiple cultural values are negotiated across academic disciplines, can educators help students also negotiate conflicting cultural values among home, classroom, and campus life?  How can the Internet and social media further cultural adaptations and exchanges?

Presented Papers

Adrianne Aron
“The Closing of Borders, Schools and Minds”


Lisa Konczal
“Contextual Considerations in Education Trajectories of Immigrants:  A Study of Nicaraguans in Different Places and Among Different Compatriots”


David Liu and Booker T. Ingram
“The Rights of Non-Citizens: American Democracy and Illegal Immigration”


Mark Malisa
“Ubuntu as an Alternative to Western/Enlightenment Human Values”


Susan Montgomery
“The ‘Immigrant Experience’ of assimilation for People with Behavioral Health Diagnoses”

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2010 CALL FOR PAPERS

Making Choices: Sustainability in a World of Conflicting Values

Forty years after the first Earth Day, environmental concerns are greater than ever. For humankind to realize a sustainable future, we must take dramatic action and change individual and collective behavior. But are we capable of such change? What values will motivate individuals and groups to initiate and sustain earth-friendly behavior? What would sustainable human life look like?

Sustainability involves issues and concerns related to the environment, economic and political structures, religious worldviews, and individual and collective moral behavior. It can be studied from a variety of disciplinary perspectives—from the natural sciences to the social sciences to the humanities…[read more=”Click here to Read More” less=”Read Less”]

 

For 2010, the Society for Values in Higher Education (an interdisciplinary organization committed to the role of higher education in promoting citizenship and socially responsible values) is organizing afternoon working groups for scientists, scholars, and educators to present work that addresses sustainability from a variety of disciplinary perspectives. Working groups will meet for 1.5 hours each afternoon for three days and will deal with one of two sets of questions.

Human Capabilities and Moral Motivation:

Are human beings capable of making the choices and acting in such a way that we can have a sustainable future? Or are we doomed? Will there be a Darwinian solution? What lessons from our past might provide insight about our capacity to make the kind of sacrifices necessary? Are we capable of practicing the kind of distributive justice necessary for human sustainability? What are the limits of human action? What are the limits of deliberative democracy? What is the common ground on which different approaches to “nature” (scientific, religious, humanist, etc.) can meet to create a more sustainable future? What does it mean to lead a good life in a world of limited resources?

Strategies and Negotiations:

What strategies are effective in leading institutions of higher education to implement sustainability programs? How are the multiple values of institutions negotiated in order to promote sustainability? What institutional values have led to sustainable practices? What are some effective models? How do we educate students to value sustainability and the common good? What curricular or co-curricular strategies promote these values?

Presented Papers:

WORKING GROUP NO. 1: HUMAN CAPABILITIES AND MORAL MOTIVATIONS

David Burrell—Uganda Martyrs University
Diverse Approaches to Nature and a Sustainable Future
Greg Capillo—Western Kentucky University
Learning to Talk to an Other: Stories and Thoughts About Community Organizing in a Divided Nation
Jo Margaret Mano—SUNY New Platz
Assessing Sustainability Claims: Key Factors in Case Studies
Brian Strow and Claudia Strow—Western Kentucky University
Sustainability and Government Budgeting; or, I’ll gladly have my kids pay you tomorrow for the social services I receive today
Carlos Antonio Torre—Southern Connecticut State University and Yale University
Janice Ann Smith—Educational Consultant, Three Canoes
The Ecology of Education: Reflections on a Sustainable Future

WORKING GROUP NO. 2: STRATEGIES AND NEGOTIATIONS

J. Anthony Abbott—Stetson University
Notes from the Field on Challenges and Opportunities to Signatories of the American College and University Presidents Climate Commitment
Susan G. Montgomery—Environmental Health Researcher (Atlanta, Georgia)
“Measure It and It Will Come…”:  New Measurements Promote Energy and Healthcare Markets
Daniel J. Sherman—University of Puget Sound
Sustainability as a Way of Thinking: Tools for Understanding Sustainability as Critical Inquiry and Achieving Integration Across the Higher Education Curriculum
Paul A. Swift—Bryant University
Field Strategies for Sustainability: What Does Art Have To Do With Waste?[/expander_maker]

2009 CALL FOR PAPERS

“Organically Related: University and Professional Education,”  Timothy J. Cash, University of Illinois.

Parables—Study at the Intersection of Epistemologies,”  Alan Dagovitz and Rick Elgendy, University of Chicago.

Toward a Pedagogical Praxis that Radicalizes Social Awareness,”  Jack A. Hill, Texas Christian University.

The Compatibility of a Liberal Education and a Consumer Culture,”  Marsha Kobre Anderson, Sierra Nevada College.

The New Media Approach to Higher Education,”  Danny Paskin, California State University, Long Beach.

“Rational Self-Interest, Intellectual Curiosity, and the Capitalist University,” Paul Swift, Bryant University (Rhode Island).

University as Wal Mart: Exploring Consumerism in Academia,” Sandy Watson, University of Tennessee (Chattanooga) and Joe Morris, Dalton State University.

Putting Cultural Trends in Context: Teaching Values in Universities,” Mary Beth Yount, Duquesne University.

The Bologna Process: ‘Europe of Euro’ vs. ‘Europe of Knowledge,’” Pavel Zgaga, University of Ljubljana (Slovenia)